The Catholic University of America

The core of the First-Year Experience is a sequence of four foundational courses in Theology, Philosophy, and English. These courses are:

Philosophy 201 and 202: The Classical Mind and The Modern Mind 

Focused on the careful reading of foundational philosophical texts, these two courses will help you cultivate a sense of philosophical wonder and an openness to the awesome mystery of the world that we normally miss. Starting from the kinds of questions we ask in everyday life - what should I do? what is the meaning of all this? - you’ll learn how to refine those questions and test out some of the answers that have most influenced how we understand ourselves. 

Theology and Religious Studies 201: Faith Seeking Understanding 

This one semester theology course continues the dialogue between reason and faith begun in The Classical Mind. Through readings from the Bible, the early Church fathers, and Vatican II documents, you’ll explore - through faith and reason - God and God’s creation. 

English 101: Writing: Logic and Rhetoric

In this intensive writing course, you will learn to use writing to advance your thinking. As you discover more fully the connection between clear thinking and compelling writing, you will expand your powers of analysis and persuasion while establishing a firm foundation for all the writing you will do in college. 

 

Questions? Visit the FAQ or contact the FYE. 

  

 

 

The University Honors Program and the FYE

Students in the University Honors Program are enrolled in an Honors Learning Community, where they will move through the core curriculum with a cohort of Honors students. Some of these classes are specifically tailored to the Honors curriculum. Others are similar to their non-Honors equivalents, but are taught by Honors faculty and taken with fellow Honors students.

The Philosophy and Theology courses listed below can be counted toward completion of the Honors tracks in those disciplines.

 

 

Honors Philosophy 101: The Desire to Know

This course will help you to acquire the basic skills necessary to understand and appreciate Aristotle’s philosophy, exploring the nature and function of logic in philosophy as well as in other disciplines like science, politics, and literature. With a focus on syllogistic and deductive reasoning, you will consider the relationships between thought, language, knowledge, and reality.

 

Honors Philosophy 102: Human Action and Government

This course continues your study of Aristotle’s philosophy, with a focus on the concepts of right reason and right action developed in Nicomachean Ethics and Politics. You will discuss the perfection of the soul through intellectual and moral virtues, and explore the function of these virtues in the larger human context.

Honors students in the School of Arts and Sciences and the School of Philosophy take Honors Philosophy 101 and 102.

Honors Philosophy 211 and 212: The Classical Mind and The Modern Mind

Focused on the careful reading of foundational philosophical texts, these two courses will help you cultivate a sense of philosophical wonder, and an openness to the awesome mystery of the world that we normally miss. Starting from the kinds of questions we ask in everyday life - what should I do? what is the meaning of all this? - you’ll learn how to refine those questions and test out some of the answers that have most influenced how we understand ourselves.

Honors students in the professional schools take Honors Philosophy 211 and 212. 

Honors Theology and Religious Studies 101: Scripture and Tradition in the Life of the Church

This course provides an introduction to the academic discipline of theology through the examination of selected theologians and scripture. You will learn how to read and interpret texts from different historical eras, including the Old Testament, the New Testament, the early Church, the Middle Ages, the Reformation era, the period of the Second Vatican Council, and the present time.

 

English 101H: Writing: Logic and Rhetoric

In this intensive writing course, you will learn to use writing to advance your thinking. As you discover more fully the connection between clear thinking and compelling writing, you will expand your powers of analysis and persuasion while establishing a firm foundation for all the writing you will do in college.

 

Questions? Visit the University Honors Program website or contact the FYE.

 

 

Contact Us

McMahon Hall 13
202-319-5220
cua-fye@cua.edu